pshyvers

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  • Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Iron Supplementation Protocol #36316

    I learned recently that eating vitamin C at the same time as non-heme iron has been experimentally observed to nearly triple iron absorption. Note this was not throughout the day but in the same meal. Since then, have been working to include fresh fruits, berries, citrus in meals with plant sources of iron. Note that while onion contains vitamin C, the vitamin is fragile & destroyed with heat.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Article with cautions on female fasted training #36309

    The linked article comes across as mainly warning about inadequate nutrition, e.g. poor diet, eating disorders, etc.

    Fasted training as I implement it simply entails running before breakfast in the morning. Although I am male, it’s been effective for me and I don’t really see anything in the linked article to make me concerned about it, male or female, as I eat right after. I keep it low intensity & the duration under an hour- I’ll start to crash if I go much beyond an hour.


    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: AeT Thought Experiment #31437

    Indoor DIY Guide to Determining Your Aerobic Threshold: Treadmill Test

    Remember that knowing your exact AeT is not really all that important. If you can develop an idea that it is (for example) between 155-160bpm, that’s good enough for defining your Z1 training range.

    The question for me is, what happens if we find out, months later, that we were too high or low? Wouldn’t that kind of overtraining have effects much more insidious than a single 3-hour bout? If we were undertraining, the harm would be less. But we might be sacrificing potential gains.

    As I understand it, there’s nothing wrong with your estimate being a little low. There’s no particular value in training right at AeT. Your objective in Z1 training is to accumulate time somewhere in Z1, not time right at AeT.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: AeT Thought Experiment #31374

    I really like the DIY Anaerobic Threshold Test because it is a direct measure of maximum output for a given period of time (in this case 30-60 minutes). Unlike gas exchange or blood lactate it’s at the level where the rubber sole meets the trail.

    I ought to be able to conceive of something similar for AeT.

    In a sense, that’s what the AeT treadmill test is. The maximum output you can sustain for a given period of time- with your mouth closed. There’s obviously some variance depending on how well your nose functions, but (after I got my nose fixed) I was pleased & surprised how quickly I went from “I could do this all day” @ 162bpm to “oh my god I need AIR” @ 165bpm. It was nowhere near as subjective as I thought it might be.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Can There Be Too Much Recovery Work? #28640

    It does occur to me after writing this that perhaps one way to manage this is, instead of tracking it as part of my weekly volume, I could ramp more on the aggressive side knowing that I have plenty of recovery time to back it up. But maybe that’s really just a different way of accomplishing the same thing, that is to say counting it in my weekly volume.


    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Heart Rate Drift, Temperature, Recovery #28615

    Got it, so essentially the HR is increased in hot environments somewhat independent of the training load due to cooling needs. Fascinating bit about the blood vessel dilation, I can see how the dots connect. So in those environments, HR is probably not a very reliable metric (unless perhaps you are well conditioned to the heat?)

    Thanks, figures. Used to happen a lot more, much less common for me anymore but noticed it today. Perhaps one way to take it would be that my aerobic capacity is adequate in cool weather but not yet fully developed enough for the additional demands of hot weather.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Appetite loss #27848

    I just wanted to add, are you sure your hydration is taken care of? Dehydration can cause nausea & loss of appetite.


    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Training Calf Strength/Endurance #23304

    The managed training answer would be something like, add calf strength work now & convert that strength to endurance later this summer. (You can’t go straight to hill sprints & ME, you need to build general strength first)

    But your calves are probably not all that deficient (unless the soreness is really debilitating) and it’s possible it could clear up easily with a little more fasthiking, after which you would be able to forget about it.

    For me it would depend on how big I felt the gap was. Mild soreness for an hour after, or torture climbing stairs for days after?


    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Recommended mountaineering watches #23301

    If you have very inaccurate GPS tracks with a Fenix, the first thing to experiment with is disabling UltraTrac, which is a great feature but doesn’t work very well in difficult terrain such as trees, valleys, & canyons.

    I find with my older Fenix, sometimes the auto-cal hasn’t triggered recently, so as I leave the trailhead I’ll trigger it. Then it’s usually not an issue for the rest of the day.

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by  pshyvers.
    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: What heart rate is too low for training? #22592

    That counts alright, it’s low end Z1 or recovery pace. The response may not be “significant” but it counts as part of your total aerobic base.


    Participant

    Very creative! Todd, you can see he’s girth hitched a sling to the head & seatpost each. The slings loop over the pole spikes.

    I guess a possible downside would be losing the eccentric training for your legs (which crosses over to skiing), but it certainly would make the training day a lot more fun!

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Uphill speed crashes after +2000m ascent #22456

    It could be interesting to find a local steep trail and hike 3800m of gain at a modest pace. See how you feel afterwards. If you try to do those 3800m and key muscles are fatiguing even at a laid-back pace, you’ve narrowed it down.

    I empathize; I have also noticed I hit a wall on ascent. For me, I’ve since discovered the small muscles in my hips start to fatigue early, which seems like a clear sign I have ME work to do there.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Hamstrings #22145

    @cramblda, you seem to be saying you have given up on stretching and that it doesn’t help flexiblity, but the link you posted to explain why it doesn’t do anything says:

    There is really only one stretching benefit that seems to be clear and (almost) uncontroversial: it does actually increase flexibility. Even just plain old static stretching. For whatever it’s worth, people do seem to be more flexible when they stretch regularly for a while. Real elongation of tissue is elusive, and hard to sustain; but it can be done. The phenomenon is widely observed, and seems to have been confirmed by experiments.

    Does that fit with your understanding?

    Personally I don’t care about most forms of flexibility, but my hamstrings make it almost impossible for me to pike, which means I’m mechanically incapable of performing an L-sit, good hanging leg raise, or indeed even just sitting on the floor upright with my legs straight.

    @jasper, one thing I did hear from a PT was that for a good improvement in flexibility, it’s important to massage, foam-roll, or otherwise “work” the muscle before you stretch it. Something about the limit of elongation actually being partly neuromuscular, i.e. your nervous system preventing it from stretching any longer, which the foam rolling temporarily interrupts.


    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: Elevation gain limits #21645

    I live at 5,000′. I’m not sure what happens if I start at 6,000′, generally everything skinnable starts somewhere around 9,000′ or above, and we’ll go up to 12,000′ or so. Most of my favorite hikes are up there too. It certainly is possible that I’m just getting overwhelmed by elevation, or something else, but I thought it was interesting that I frequently start crashing right around the same total elevation gain for the day. Now additionally as I reply to you, thinking about the outings that I do, they are by far and away most commonly between 1,500-2,500′ just because that’s what is around, which further hints that maybe I need some training with more elevation gain in a day.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  pshyvers.
    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  pshyvers.

    Participant
    pshyvers on · in reply to: TFTNA – Climbing and Volume #21133

    Scott, what about strength training? Is that also not included?

    I’ve just always wondered. The book talks a lot about weekly training hours and how it should progress week to week, but I couldn’t find clarity on whether that was just aerobic activity or not. So neither technical rock climbing or strength training (e.g. general strength, core routine) are intended to be included in the weekly training hours number?

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  pshyvers.
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