tonys

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  • Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Oxygen Pulse #9399

    Yes Scott, “oxygen ejected from the ventricles” does not sound good. I actually got it from a book called “The Athletic Horse” (Second Edition). But I read similar definitions on some other books, not horse related.
    And yes, I’ve also been tracking my speed at AeT and AnT and it has been improving a lot since training as taught on TFTNA.

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Oxygen Pulse #9393

    Hi!
    I really meant “oxygen pulse”. I too hadn’t ever heard about it until I got my effort test results.
    I did some research and what I learned is oxygen pulse is defined as “the ratio of oxygen consumption to heart rate and expresses the volume of oxygen ejected from the ventricles with each cardiac contraction”. It is calculated as the peak Vo2 divided by peak HR. So it is an index of stroke volume in association with oxygen extraction.

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Training breakthroughs #9069

    I’ll read it.
    Thank you Steve!

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Test Results #9068

    Ok, got it. Thank you!

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Test Results #8985

    You’re welcome. I’ve been reading a little about you and Steve and I think it is really awesome to be able to reach to someone of your caliber for tips and expertise.
    So, thank you for the in depth, clear response.

    By your answer I can tell I’m probably not reasoning very well on this one, but my thought on the absolute maxVO2-LT thing arises from the following: Athlete A weights 70kg and has a maxVO2 of 75ml/kg/min, so he has an absolute maxVO2 of around (70kg x 75ml/kg/min) 5250 V’O2 ml/min (not sure if I’m using the correct notation), right? Athlete B weights 60kg with a maxVO2 of 75ml/kg/min, so he has an absolute value of (60kg x 75ml/kg/min) 4500 V’O2 ml/min. So, say that most of A’s added weight is muscle mass located on the upper body, so A and B’s leg muscle mass is the same. Regarding LT at running, wouldn’t A have some sort of advantage over B as he would be able to supply more O2 to the specific leg muscles being used, which have the same mass as B’s? So, same leg muscle mass, but different supply of O2 to the recruited fibers. Again, I may not be reasoning very well.

    Now that you mention economy, may I also ask something else. Improved economy can be attained through changes in what? Technique? I’ve carefully watched videos of mountain running athletes such as Kilian, Marco de Gasperi, Stian Angermund Vik and they all seem to have very “clean” movements, solid footing, landing mostly on the forefoot, having little air time and vertical motion on the uphills, etc. Specially with Kilian, there are little to no “parasitic” movements, I think.

    Once again, thank you very much. Love this discussions!

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Training breakthroughs #8935

    Ok, thank you Scott! That’s kind of what I thought. Though I’ve been learning a lot recently, so lots of “breakthroughs” to me ๐Ÿ˜‰
    Thanks!

    • This reply was modified 3 years ago by tonys.
    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Blood test, performance and health #8723

    Thanks Scott!

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: ADS Symptoms #8679

    Thanks!

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Any benefits to wall sits? #8678

    Ok. Thanks Scott!

    Participant
    tonys on · in reply to: Vertical Kilometer Performance #8657

    Thank you very much Scott and Scott! Both for the tips and the in depth replies.
    And yes, I totally see how interlinked the components are. Fascinating!
    Will definitely be posting more questions in the future, if you don’t mind.
    Thanks

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