Mariner_9

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Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 116 total)
  • Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Stride length and touring efficiency #50909

    Thank you both for your comments, much appreciated.

    Would perhaps have been fairer of me to write that *part of* “the sales pitch for using hardboots when splitboarding is that they facilitate a longer stride length”. I do understand there are other advantages. And I’m not trying to bring the hardboot/softboot religious war to UA. 🙂

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Ultralight, 4-season sleeping bag recommendation #50693

    @Rachel – I emailed Rab who responded that, “The Rab sleep limit is what we believe the sensible limit of the bag to be from past experience and feedback from our athletes”. This assumes you do *not* use a liner bag and/or sleep clothed.


    @John
    S – the only bag they have rated <-12C is limited to ‘small’ size only (I’d need a regular). And having spoken to them last week, I know they’ve stopped doing all special orders and won’t make any exceptions.

    re: border crossing – I know people do that but it’s often illegal. The limit on the value of goods you can bring back even for >48h out the country is C$800, which is below the cost of many of the bags in question.


    @Scott
    Semple – spreadsheet already in place. Can’t post so I took a screenshot and uploaded it to Imgur

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Ultralight, 4-season sleeping bag recommendation #50415

    Thanks, Rachel. I used to have a Rab Ascent bag which was roomy enough (different shape, though that’s much more noticeable for the legs than the shoulders). Being fairly skinny, I’m not worried about shoulder room.

    As to the temperature ratings: it seems Rab, Western Mountaineering and Feathered Friends all have different terminology and it’s not clear they’re comparable..?

    Quick check suggests no Canadian distribution for FF; MEC is essentially the only retailer for WM which likely means only the camping/hiking/lower-spec models will be available here.

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Ultralight, 4-season sleeping bag recommendation #50315

    Thank you all for the suggestions.

    The difficulty with brands that don’t have distribution in Canada is that, while there are no import duties on products made in the US, there are hefty customs fees simply for “clearance”. These can add as much as 20% to the price of the product.

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Hiking boot recommendations #50254

    Ended up only using the Zamberlan boots when there was still snow on the ground (up until mid-July and October onwards, here). Very happy with them – didn’t require any breaking in, no issues with comfort on longer hikes and they feel lighter than my old Sportiva Pamir boots.

    For the summer, I used a pair of Sportiva Akasha shoes which were recommended in another thread (https://www.uphillathlete.com/forums/topic/trekking-poles-and-shoes/). They’re very light and comfortable and of course breathability is good given the design, though at the expense of waterproofing. Unfortunately they proved not to be very durable. Rubber/fabric interface was coming apart and the fabric had several tears after less than three months use (Jul-Sep). To their credit, Sportiva replaced them under warranty.

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Abbreviated max strength routine #36764

    “Can you point me to the page where it says to use max strength as a warm-up? (And in which book?)”

    TFNA, location 4210 in Kindle. “One Max Strength maintenance workout as warm-up for core routine.”

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Fat Adaptation vs Conventional Training #36699

    “For me, training fasted also limits my strength and climbing sessions as I have to do my workouts in the AM”

    The idea is to do the Z1/Z2 workouts in a fasted state, not strength or ME workouts. Reading between the lines, glycogen depletion might limit the efficacy of strength or ME workouts which should not be the case for aerobic work. Happy to be corrected if wrong!

    Participant

    Hi trygve,

    I’m also training for splitboarding and hiking. I only have TFNA so can’t comment on UA. For ME, I’ve been doing weighted box steps (or stair climbs) as recommended in TFNA. I use 5 pound ankle weights on each leg and 20 pounds in a backpack to emulate as closely as possible what I carry when splitting.

    re: “Nothing is more delighting for a splitboarder than passing by Dynafitters when skinng uphill” – on the contrary, nothing is better than being out all day and not seeing anyone else. 😉

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: All Aerobic Workouts on Stairs #32623

    My 2c from having trained in the flatlands for hiking/splitboarding:
    – the advantage of training on stairs if you go down as well as up is that it improves eccentric strength which is helpful for hiking and skiing/boarding
    – the disadvantage is that your HR will be well below your AeT on the way down. Running or using a treadmill allows you to keep your HR close to target for the entirety of the workout
    – going upstairs but not downstairs can be practically difficult as some (many?) buildings regard stairs as fire escape-only and restrict access to the stairs from the lobby
    – I would not assume stairs will be injury-free. The descent places a fair amount of stress on the knees

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by Mariner_9.
    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: looking for stretch recommendations/ressources #32321

    I found ‘Fit to Ski and Snowboard’ (Amazon link) useful for stretches (for everything else, see TFNA!).

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Consequences of delayed eating after workout #32320

    Thanks for your detailed reply, Rebecca.

    At the moment, all my workouts are ~2 hours and are done in a fasted state (first thing in the morning). It’s normally possible to eat within ~1 hour of finishing but yesterday was an exception and I was curious as to the effects.

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Is walking to work an exercise? #31952

    I always counted this as active recovery. If your HR is below Zone 1 then I doubt you will get any training stimulus from this type of exercise.

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Adding Downhill Skiing #31916

    Depending on the volume, a day of downhill skiing might be more like a muscular endurance workout than a strength workout.

    Some other thoughts:
    – Effects of the day will depend how much hiking you do inbounds. Steep hill at altitude carrying some gear should feel like weighted box steps. 🙂
    – Terrain would also have a significant effect, e.g. moguls are going to impose more stress than corduroy.

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Do you drink to thirst or drink to a plan? #30983

    For hiking (usually ~6-8 hours), I take a hydration pack with 2 liters of water mixed with 4 Nunn tablets (non-caffeinated). I usually take some iodine tablets and refill from a stream. When I was younger I never bothered with the iodine and would drink straight from a stream but got more paranoid as I got older.

    For splitboarding (similar duration), I normally take a 1 liter collapsible water ‘bottle’ and a flask with 0.5 liters of herbal tea.

    My impression is I need at least ~0.5 liters of fluids per hour but don’t always get this and normally come back thirsty. For that reason, I try to take extra water and tea and leave them in the car for when I get back.

    Participant
    Mariner_9 on · in reply to: Max Strength progression #30925

    Thank you both for your replies.


    @Scott
    Johnston: this is the ascending sets concept from the recent article. I’ve never used this but I’m open to trying it.


    @Scott
    Semple:
    – I’m training for hiking and splitboarding so my strength training is focused on legs (I do also include Scott’s Killer Core Routine as part of my strength training). I do some scrambling but no climbing and no ski (or snowboard) mountaineering
    – The leg exercises I do at present are box step-ups, single-leg squats and lunges. Weight is up to 35% of bodyweight in each hand. In between each leg exercise, I do some upper body exercises so I’m active while my legs rest
    – As to why I want to make the workout harder – simply because it now feels easy and I don’t want to plateau as I think – perhaps incorrectly – that I could benefit from being stronger

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 116 total)