Why would HR go down on a steep hill ?

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #34064

    hellojenrau
    Participant

    Hi

    I am so happy to find these forums! I did my AnT test today. I use a Polar Vantage m watch which I bought for the accuracy of its wrist hr monitor and it seems on so far. But today’s test was so wierd. I warmed up a bit long maybe 20 minutes because I had to get to the big hill. I will say I am terrible on hills and just never seem to get stronger. My legs burn early and I end up hiking. So I started running up the big hill at a pretty slow pace and my legs start dying fast and my breathing increases but HR starts slowing down. After 10 minutes my heart is beating so hard, legs are burning to the max but HR is still showing about my AeT (140) though my perceived exertion was much much more than during that test. Then equally bizarre going back downhill running fast my HR goes way up (157).

    Could it be just my slow ass pace up the hill or maybe the cooler temps this morning vs during the treadmill AeT test? Or do I just need to suck it up and order the HR chest strap because maybe this doesn’t make any sense at all? Love any feedback


  • Participant
    Dada on #34079

    Hi Hellojenrau,

    Your observation could have two underlying explanations:

    1. the watch was not able to track your HR with the handwrist sensor (very likely)

    2. When your muscular endurance is your limitation, the perceived effort is high although your HR is not keeping pace (in your case less likely: see 1.)

    Suggestion: repeat the test with a strap

    Dada


    Participant
    Brian DrV on #34084

    I second Dada re: wrist/optical HR. They seem to work for some people, but for me personally I only use wrist HR to check HR during the day and when I wake up. If I’m running, I use a strap. There are a couple ways to make wrist HR better: warm up for a good 15 min or so. I find it takes optical HRMs a bit to “lock on”. When I don’t have or forget my strap for some reason I always assume that my HR will be erratic and impossibly high and low for a mile or so. Second, experiment and see if it works better on the other wrist or turned so that the sensor is underneath (palm side) your wrist. Also try moving it up your arm a bit and cranking it down tight. Finally, get a strap if you can afford it. My Garmin HRM run (i have the black one with the snap on pod) works great. Used to use a polar H7. One not very secret trick is to use a little electrode gel on the strap sensors, especially when it’s cold and dry out.


    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #34090

    “…which I bought for the accuracy of its wrist hr monitor and it seems on so far.”

    How do you know? What calibrated, accurate device output did you compare it to?

    It’s highly unlikely that the wrist monitor is accurate. Don’t use wrist monitors for proper endurance training. There’s only one way to make it better: Get a chest strap.

    My legs burn early and I end up hiking.

    That’s normal. Very few humans can actually run uphill, especially at AeT. “Mountain running” is more good marketing than anything. “Hiking races” just doesn’t have the same ring… 🙂

    …legs are burning to the max but HR is still showing about my AeT (140) though my perceived exertion was much much more than during that test.

    You were using a wrist monitor.

    Then equally bizarre going back downhill running fast my HR goes way up (157).

    You were using a wrist monitor.

    Or do I just need to suck it up and order the HR chest strap?

    Yes.


    Participant
    hellojenrau on #34104

    Thank you for feedback! I’ll buy one.

    When i bought this watch I read several peoples experiments comparing wrist to chest strap and it seemed very accurate but since this test made no sense i’m doubting it. i got a good workout none the less.

    I just thought maybe it was something like I don’t have the leg muscle or power to get my heart rate up on hills I don’t know but hills are definitely my weakness. I’ll report back.


    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #34106

    I just thought maybe it was something like I don’t have the leg muscle or power to get my heart rate up on hills…

    That would be my first conclusion as well, but it’s hard to be certain without an accurate measure of heart rate.


    Participant
    Ewa on #34164

    I am a beta tester of sport watches of one of the main brands. I tested OHR measurement and it is often 10% off in my case comparing to the one from a HR belt, left hand, right hand, in, out. The best accuracy was for running, worst for cycling or climbing. Moreover, using poles, like in skimo or uphill running, decreases accuracy of the wrist measurement.


    Participant
    TerryLui on #34236

    These links may be helpful:

    Downhill – High HR but low RR?

    Downhill Running Technique


    Participant
    hellojenrau on #34237

    Those links are really helpful. I felt like my cadence might be tricking it. My foot turn over is like molasses uphill.

    I bought the chest strap.

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