Treadmill grade for AeT test

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #35620
    Blake Bolton
    Participant

    I’m currently training for Alpine climbing and am taking an AeT test in the lab on Thursday. Last year I did it on a flat treadmill and afterwards I read that I should have done it on an incline. Any recommendations on how steep the treadmill should be? I did a forum search and didn’t see anything (possibly missed it). Any advice is greatly appreciated thanks!

  • Participant
    nullkru on #35639

    Hi Blake,

    Indoor DIY Guide to Determining Your Aerobic Threshold: Treadmill Test


    Here they write 10%

    It’s not for lab testing but i think make sense too.

    Participant
    Blake Bolton on #35670

    Thanks so much for the article link. Much appreciated

    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #35674

    Thanks, @nullkru.


    @heshfilmer
    : I would use whatever you’ll have consistent access to for both training and testing. 10% is almost universal for treadmills, so that’s a good grade to go by. However, if you know that you’ll consistently have access to something steeper (for both lab tests, training, and your own tests), then that would be more specific to alpine climbing.

    Participant
    chiquetetekik on #35723

    Scott or Scott J., could you describe the test that Luke Nelson does in the image on page 156 of TFUA? Just change the inclination of the treadmill and the speed is constant?

    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #35886

    Because of the max, it looks like a VO2 max test. Some labs will do as you describe, especially toward the end of the test. However, I’m not a fan of that approach.

    It makes sense at the end of a test, after AeT and AnT have been established, to ramp up the grade to find maximum quickly before the athlete tires. However, earlier when finding AeT and AnT, changes in speed without a change in angle are easier to control the change in demand. Changes in speed are more linear, while changes in grade are more exponential.

    I’ve been meaning to write an article about how changes in angle create more demand. Hopefully I’ll get around to it…

    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #35887

    Because of the max, it looks like a VO2 max test. Some labs will do as you describe, especially toward the end of the test. However, I’m not a fan of that approach.

    It makes sense at the end of a test, after AeT and AnT have been established, to ramp up the grade to find maximum quickly before the athlete tires. However, earlier when finding AeT and AnT, changes in speed without a change in angle are easier to control the change in demand. Changes in speed are more linear, while changes in grade are more exponential.

    I’ve been meaning to write an article about how changes in angle create more demand. Hopefully I’ll get around to it…

Viewing 6 replies - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.