Regressing in aerobic conditioning?

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  • #51097
    samanthadcook
    Participant

    So, I started with TFTNA almost exactly a year ago. When I began this training, I could run a 10k in ~50 minutes, but I had no “conversational” pace. If I was moving, I was panting. I had all the classic symptoms of aerobic deficiency syndrome, so I threw myself into long, slow jogs/runs. At first, I could only job downhill; I had to mostly walk to keep my HR below AeT. I was doing 15-16min miles. By summer, I was down to 12 minutes. Great! My AeT even nudged up a few beats. But come fall, I was slowing back down again. I tried taking two weeks off, but when I returned, the problem persisted. I’ve tried lowering my training volume. I’m even seeing an allergist to be treated for possible exercise-induced asthma with Montelukast and Symbicort with an inhalation chamber (my spirometry came back negative for asthma, but I have all the symptoms, so my doc agreed to let me try treatment). Nothing has helped. I’m right back to where I was a year ago, having to jog my downhills, jog/walk flats, and take many pauses on uphills to stay below AeT.

    I live in Seattle, and our winters are very mild. It’s not like I’m trying to perform in sub-freezing temperatures.

    I don’t have any history of illness. I saw a cardiologist a few years ago due to high heart rate during exercise (I was a college rower and I’d regularly hit 210bpm on my workouts), but he found no problems. His answer to me was “some people just have higher heart rates.”

    I’m super frustrated and unsure of where to turn next. Has anyone dealt with regression in their aerobic conditioning?

  • Moderator
    Shashi on #51115

    Welcome to the forum.

    I am assuming you did an indoor or outdoor AeT test last year and another one recently. You mentioned that pace has dropped on trails, did you see a drop in your AeT based on the tests?

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Shashi.
    Moderator
    LindsayTroy on #51122

    I have to ask… overtraining? what kinds of loads were you hitting?

    Participant
    samanthadcook on #51159

    This was my first thought as well! In October/November, when I first started noticing this downward trend, I was about a month into the 6mo mountaineering training plan and so I was at probably ~8hrs/week. About on par with what I had done most of the year, and all of it under AeT. For the last 2-ish months (while trying to figure out my allergy and asthma situation), I’ve cut back to 4ish hours per week, all under AeT.

    Participant
    samanthadcook on #51160

    Thank you!

    I have not re-tested since November. I suppose that should be my next move. I haven’t done it because even my slowest jog still gets my HR above my previous threshold. As I understand it, if I am not near my AeT threshold (and therefore not dealing with HR drift), I should be able to find a pace where I can keep my HR around a desired target?

    Moderator
    Shashi on #51163

    You might have already read this, but this article has all the information you need for AeT Test.

    In your case, an indoor test might be better as you can walk at an incline and maintain the pace once your heart rate stabilizes around the target heart rate.

    Moderator
    TerryLui on #51256

    His answer to me was “some people just have higher heart rates.”

    I should be able to find a pace where I can keep my HR around a desired target?

    These 2 comments jumped out at me. Perhaps I am reading into it too much but I need to ask the question:
    Do you have a specific BPM that you are “targeting?”

    If not, then great. Redo the AeT test and let us know how it compares to the first one you did.

    If so, I would caution you away from getting attached to a specific HR # and pace. Go into the training/AeT test with a “(re)discovery” mindset. If your nose breathing/conversational pace is X then it is what it is. One person’s AeT @ X BPM is another person’s @ X-10 or X+10, at the end of the day your AeT is yours alone and unique to you. It’s your base/starting point, work from there onwards 🙂

    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #52367

    In addition to what Terry said:

    I would caution you away from getting attached to a specific HR # and pace. Go into the training/AeT test with a “(re)discovery” mindset. If your nose breathing/conversational pace is X then it is what it is. One person’s AeT @ X BPM is another person’s @ X-10 or X+10, at the end of the day your AeT is yours alone and unique to you. It’s your base/starting point, work from there onwards

    … are you taking any supplements? Iron perhaps? An athlete of mine over-supplemented with iron, spiking his blood pressure, and reducing his output.

    However, don’t make that conclusion without a blood test.

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