HR Zones, non-footborne

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #41253
    Steve B
    Participant

    I’ve been going through the mtn performance workshop video series (excellent bang for buck, especially now with the discount – highly recommend) and it got me thinking, which is never good.

    Anyway, I’m stuck in probably the flattest place I’ve ever been (eastern shore of MD), so I’ve just been cycling as it’s far safer than running here (there are no sidewalks anywhere). The bay and ocean are fast approaching temps warm enough for me to get back into swimming (post bilateral shoulder surgery, so I’m extra stoked). I won’t be doing any mountain fun until airlines recover and I get to move back west to Salt Lake.

    THat’s the long way of asking, do my Uphill-Athelte calculated zones carry over into non footborne activities such as swimming and cycling? I have never trained by HR in swimming, only pace and feeling.

    Thanks guys. Looking forward to tomorrow’s story time.

  • Participant
    arhab on #41322

    It is my experience that the uphill athlete zones are too strenuous for cycling. Perhaps it has something to do with cycling using primarily leg muscles. For cycling I use training zones as explained in: https://www.highnorth.co.uk/articles/cycling-training-zones.

    Hope this helps.

    Participant
    Dada on #41333

    My experience:

    Corresponding cycling zones are lower, swimming zones probably higher. Arhab already explained it by the degree of muscle movement.

    Example AeT for me:
    Mountaineering w/o poles 147 (just legs)
    Mountaineering w/ poles 155 (legs and arms)
    Running – 165 (whole body movement and core)
    Rollerskiing – 170 (whole body)

    What does your nose breathing say while cycling?

    Best regards
    Dada

    Participant
    arhab on #41337

    FYI, my zones:

    AeT running: 156
    AeT cycling: 148

    AnT running: 168
    AnT: cycling: 174

    What does this mean in terms of ADS? I’m NOT aerobically deficient when running, but am I when cycling? Or does the 10% rule not apply for cycling???

    And, lastly, when running my measured HRmax is 205, while when cycling I can’t get it higher than 192.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by arhab. Reason: typo
    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #41361

    What does this mean in terms of ADS? I’m NOT aerobically deficient when running, but am I when cycling? Or does the 10% rule not apply for cycling???

    Yes, you could be. Mechanics play a huge part. If you’re less well-trained in cycling, then you’ll be less efficient. If you’re less efficient, then you could easily have a bigger gap between cycling thresholds.

    And, lastly, when running my measured HRmax is 205, while when cycling I can’t get it higher than 192.

    Unless they’ve been tested in a lab, I wouldn’t refer to any heart rate as “max”.

    Again, makes sense for the reasons already mentioned. Cycling uses less muscle mass, especially if less trained, so HRs for a certain intensity will be lower.

    Participant
    Steve B on #41407

    Re: Nose-breathing, I can easily nose-breathe while riding for a 2-3 hour ride in my “uphill athlete” zone 1. But yes, z2 and z3 feel especially hard. What y’all said about cycling using very “localized” muscle groups makes sense. I did 6×4 mins with 1 min rest in between each interval yesterday in low zone 3 and it was very difficult on my legs. my heart and lunges were fine.

    This all makes sense and confirms my suspicions. Time to adjust my cycling zones…being a lifelong swimmer, I’m not sure I’ll ever invest in the tech necessary to measure HR while swimming as I have a good idea of my effort level while swimming. Just curious about zones as they pertain to different activities with different muscle groups involved. Thanks!

    Participant
    arhab on #41422

    I can also nose-breath up to high in the 160’s. Even when I’m doing above threshold intervals and my muscles are screaming I can easily breath. I guess my muscle power is not on par with my cardiovascular capacity.

    ALso during such an interval I think I’m dying and don’t want to do another one, but I recover within 2 minutes to a zone 1 HR, and I feel “fresh” again for the next interval.

    SO I have developed a string aerobic base I guess, but now need to work on muscle power/anaerobic capacity….

    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #41561

    SO I have developed a string aerobic base I guess, but now need to work on muscle power/anaerobic capacity….

    Perhaps, but don’t rely on nose breathing to determine that. We don’t use the nasal benchmark anymore because we found that those with ADS can nose breathe well above AeT. A drift test is a better gauge of AeT.

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.