HR associated with nose breathing varies between running and hiking uphill

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  • #51171
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    Forgive me if this is a silly question, or if this topic has already been discussed in other thread (I tried to search but after 30 min, I figured it was time to post my question).

    I’ve haven’t had an opportunity to complete a heart rate drift test yet so I have been trying to gauge my AeT using ventilatory markers (nose breathing and conversations) while on my runs and hikes. I noticed that on flat runs, I can breath through my nose easily and speak short sentences around 150-155 bpm or less. However, on uphill hikes, I can only do the same at around 120 bpm or less.

    I’m curious why there is such a big difference between the two activities – is it mostly due to the uphill nature of hiking?

    Is this difference normal? Is it indicative of anything that I should consider?

    For my training, I plan to do a combination of running (~1hr as my schedule allows) and some uphill hiking (as schedule and weather allows). What heart rate zones should I be training in for each activity, given the large difference between the two?

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    Shashi on #51176

    I will let others chime in on your question related to flat run vs. uphill hike.

    I would recommend doing your AeT (heart rate drift) test and AnT test first and then setting training intensity zones based on these thresholds.

    In case you have ADS, a nose breathing test will give you a higher (and inaccurate) AeT.

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    Rachel on #51196

    You might have different AeTs for the two activities. If you have access to a treadmill you can do drift tests for both uphill hiking & flat running. During the pandemic I’ve switched to only flat AeT tests on the track. I personally don’t have an uphill that has a consistent grade for one hour. If you do have access to that kind of terrain you could test both. But if you can only test one then you can use that AeT for both activities. If your flat running AeT feels too hard on the uphill then maybe use the nose breathing to keep it easier.

    Moderator
    TerryLui on #51254

    I’m curious why there is such a big difference between the two activities – is it mostly due to the uphill nature of hiking?

    In a nutshell, yes.
    Or imagine wearing a weighted vest while running on flat terrain. You’ll be utilizing your muscles to a greater degree to propel the extra weight, leading to higher HR.
    Similar to hiking, going uphill definitely demands more of your body than running on flat ground (or even running downhill).

    Is this difference normal? Is it indicative of anything that I should consider?

    I’d say it tells you the different zones you can operate in depending on the terrain and your intended goals. Spend as much time doing goal specific training. Ex. If your goal is a vertical km trail run, then your time will be better spent training on uphill trails than running the flats (of course, recovery runs on the flats will be beneficial but key word is recovery).

    What heart rate zones should I be training in for each activity, given the large difference between the two?

    See Shashi and Rachel’s posts

    Keymaster
    Scott Semple on #52371

    In addition to the posts above:

    On flat runs, I can breathe through my nose easily and speak short sentences around 150-155 bpm or less. However, on uphill hikes, I can only do the same at around 120 bpm or less. Is this difference normal? Is it indicative of anything that I should consider?

    It’s normal and points to an opportunity to increase leg strength.

    On flat ground, running has its own forward momentum that helps. Uphill, not so much. Doing some general leg strength (3-4 weeks), then max (6-8 weeks), then ME (if AnT / AeT wouldn’t be compromised) would probably help.

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